Blog de César Salgado

Os papeis terman do que lles poñen, e internet nin che conto…

MSF work with civilians trapped by conflict in South Kivu (DRC)

Copio a continuación dúas notas de prensa publicadas en marzo por Médecins sans Frontières (MSF). Describen a carencia de medios sanitarios nalgunhas áreas do Congo (DRC, ex Zaire) onde os civís sofren frecuentes ataques de grupos armados. Este país destaca polo contraste entre as masas empobrecidas e os abundantes recursos mineiros (diamantes e coltán, por exemplo). A negrita é miña.

“Thousands of displaced civilians in DRC trapped by conflict, wounded unable to reach hospitals in Hauts Plateaux, South Kivu” (MSF press release, March 11, 2010)

The medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is deeply concerned by the rapidly worsening situation in the isolated area of Hauts Plateaux in the region of Uvira, South Kivu, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

Thousands of civilians are trapped by conflict that has been raging in the area since the beginning of February, 2010, between the Congolese army (FARDC), FDLR rebels and various armed groups. Violence against civilians is frequent, but the constant threat to civilians prevents wounded people from reaching the local hospital where an MSF surgical team is working. Currently MSF is the only medical organisation providing direct medical care in the region.

“We heard from people who have reached our medical structure that there are many civilians who are afraid to come to the hospital; they are in constant fear of being attacked by the armed groups. There is no safe place for them to hide,” said Philippe Havet, MSF’s Head of Mission in DRC. “Hauts Plateaux is a very isolated area with mountains that reach up to 3 000 metres high and no roads at all. Clashes between combatants are very fierce and civilians are the direct victims. We fear that many people could die, because they cannot reach the hospital and receive the lifesaving medical assistance they need.”

Since the beginning of February, 2010, the intense fighting in Hauts Plateaux has forced more than 10,000 people to flee their villages (Kitoga, Mugutu, Birunga and Kangova) and they have sought refuge in the area of Mukumba. On February 10, an MSF medical team started providing emergency medical assistance in Hauts Plateaux to the displaced families. Since then, MSF has provided medical care in the village of Kihuha to more than 750 patients suffering mostly from acute diarrhoea and respiratory tract infections.

The team has also received dozens of wounded people, including children, in need of emergency surgical care. A second MSF team, specializing in emergency surgery, arrived a few days later at the hospital in the nearby village of Katanga that is equipped with an operating theatre, to provide surgical care to those civilians wounded in the violent clashes. However, the team has been able to conduct very few surgeries because civilians are extremely frightened to travel to the hospital and seek help.

Currently MSF is the only international humanitarian organisation providing direct medical care in Hauts Plateaux. MSF teams face huge challenges in their effort to provide medical care to the displaced families.

“It takes five to six hours on foot to reach our medical base in Kihuha and another two hours from there to reach the hospital in Katanga, where our surgical team is based,” said Steve Avoci, MSF surgeon in Katanga. “It is very isolated here and conditions are very difficult. A few days ago, a patient arrived needing urgent surgical attention. It was a complicated surgery and it was impossible to refer him to another appropriate structure, so an MSF surgeon, based in Bukavu, helped me over the telephone to operate on the wounded patient.”

As the situation in Hauts Plateaux is steadily deteriorating, MSF is gravely concerned over the fate of the thousands of internally displaced people trapped by the conflict. MSF calls on all armed groups to respect international humanitarian law and the safety of civilians and allow immediate access to emergency medical care for those wounded during clashes.

“Wounded civilians are in desperate need of protection and emergency medical assistance. They deserve the right to have unobstructed access to our medical teams,” said Philippe Havet.

MSF is currently working in Kalonge and Kitutu in South Kivu supporting health centres and operating mobile clinics for the provision of primary healthcare and emergency assistance to displaced people and host families. MSF is also supporting health centres, Baraka Hospital and a Cholera Treatment Centre in Fizi targeting the main causes of death and disease (namely malaria, malnutrition, tuberculosis and cholera) with an emphasis on reproductive health. In North Kivu, despite ongoing insecurity and violence, MSF runs medical programmes in Rutshuru, Nyanzale, Masisi, Mweso, and Kitchanga. 76 international staff are working alongside 1 144 Congolese colleagues in MSF projects in North and South Kivu.

“DRC: Armed Congolese soldiers enter MSF hospital in Hauts Plateaux, South Kivu, and remove wounded patients” (MSF press release, March 16, 2010)

MSF demands that all parties to the conflict respect medical structures.

The medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) deplores a serious incident that happened in the isolated village of Katanga in the region of Hauts Plateaux, South Kivu. On Thursday, March 11, armed soldiers from the Congolese Army (FARDC – Forces Armées de la République Démocratique du Congo) entered the hospital of Katanga, where an MSF surgical team had been providing emergency medical care to wounded people. Despite MSF’s protests and negotiations, the Congolese soldiers, after harassing the wounded patients, left the hospital one day later with four of them.

“This incident is a violation of basic humanitarian principles; all sick and wounded have the right to medical care”, said Philippe Havet, MSF Head of Mission in South Kivu, DRC. “We demand that all armed actors respect medical structures and the safety of wounded people and medical staff. Unarmed, wounded belligerents enjoy this protection as any other patient.”

The incident has already had a negative impact on the provision of health care to people affected by the conflict in Hauts-Plateaux. As tensions were rising in the village, MSF decided to evacuate its surgical team in order to preserve the security of its staff and had to leave one wounded patient behind. It was the only medical team providing direct medical care in the region.

MSF will consider sending the surgical team back to Katanga hospital as soon as the security situation allows it. However, the incident will have a broader impact on the perception of the hospital as a safe and neutral place.

During the last weeks the MSF surgical team had been struggling to provide emergency surgical assistance to people wounded in the violent clashes that are raging in the region of Hauts Plateaux between the Congolese army (FARDC), FDLR rebels and various armed groups.

“Wounded people were already afraid to come to the hospital of Katanga and seek help, in fear of being killed by armed men”, says Havet. “Now, after this serious incident, I am afraid they will never be convinced that it is safe for them to seek any medical help.”

MSF is currently providing medical care to displaced people in the village of Kihuha, in Hauts Plateaux. MSF teams are also working in Kalonge and Kitutu in South Kivu supporting health centres and operating mobile clinics for the provision of primary healthcare and emergency assistance to displaced people and host families. MSF is also supporting health centres, Baraka Hospital and a Cholera Treatment Centre in Fizi. In North Kivu, a province also affected by insecurity and violence, MSF runs medical programmes in Rutshuru, Nyanzale, Masisi, Mweso, and Kitchanga. 76 international staff are working alongside 1144 Congolese colleagues in MSF projects in North and South Kivu.

4 Abril 2010 - Posted by | Congo (DRC), Human Rights, Médecins sans Frontières, Politics

Aínda non hai comentarios.

Deixar unha resposta

introduce os teu datos ou preme nunha das iconas:

Logotipo de WordPress.com

Estás a comentar desde a túa conta de WordPress.com. Sair / Cambiar )

Twitter picture

Estás a comentar desde a túa conta de Twitter. Sair / Cambiar )

Facebook photo

Estás a comentar desde a túa conta de Facebook. Sair / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás a comentar desde a túa conta de Google+. Sair / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s